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Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

7 edition of Authorship, commerce, and gender in early eighteenth-century England found in the catalog.

Authorship, commerce, and gender in early eighteenth-century England

a culture of paper credit

by Catherine Ingrassia

  • 269 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • England
    • Subjects:
    • English literature -- 18th century -- History and criticism.,
    • Authorship -- Economic aspects -- England -- History -- 18th century.,
    • Women and literature -- England -- History -- 18th century.,
    • Speculation -- England -- History -- 18th century.,
    • Economics in literature.,
    • Sex role in literature.,
    • England -- Economic conditions -- 18th century.,
    • England -- Commerce -- History -- 18th century.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 210-226) and index.

      StatementCatherine Ingrassia.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsPR468.E36 I54 1998
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxi, 230 p. :
      Number of Pages230
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL688284M
      ISBN 100521630630
      LC Control Number97035276

      Catherine Ingrassia, Authorship, Commerce, and Gender in Early Eighteenth-Century England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ) Central PRE36 IE4 Stephen B. Dobranski, Readers and Authorship in Early Modern England (Cambridge: . A chronological sketch of the kinds of questions and methods characteristic of recent work in eighteenth-century gender studies, drawing on representative book-length studies as examples.

      She is the author of Authorship, Commerce, and Gender in Eighteenth-Century England: A Culture of Paper Credit (Cambridge, ); editor of a critical edition of Eliza Haywood’s Anti-Pamela and Henry Fielding’s Shamela (); and co-editor of A Companion to the Eighteenth-Century Novel and Culture () and the anthology British. The first three chapters of this study read Robinson Crusoe primarily through the prism of J. G. A. Pocock’s argument in The Machiavellian Moment () that in the early eighteenth century trade is represented as effeminate by contrast with the masculine norm of military violence. This theme is augmented by Catherine Ingrassia’s commentary.

      2 Ingrassia, Authorship, Commerce, and Gender in Early Eighteenth-Century England, 30 3 John Carswell, The South Sea Bubble, (Stanford: Stanford University Press, ) 11 right, which they would have been unable to gain otherwise. 4 There was now a way for a. Gender in Eighteenth-Century England book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. A new collection of essays which challenges many exis 4/5.


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Authorship, commerce, and gender in early eighteenth-century England by Catherine Ingrassia Download PDF EPUB FB2

Authorship Commerce Gender 18C Eng: A Culture of Paper Credit Catherine Ingrassia looks at the contemporaneous development of speculative investment and the popular novel in the early eighteenth century. She shows that women were actively involved in finance as well as in fiction, and that both of these activities allowed women access to Cited by: : Authorship, Commerce, and Gender in Early Eighteenth-Century England: A Culture of Paper Credit (): Ingrassia, Catherine: BooksFormat: Hardcover.

Speculative investment and the popular novel can be seen as analogous in the early eighteenth century in offering new forms of 'paper credit'; and in both, women - who invested enthusiastically in financial schemes, and were significant producers and consumers of novels - played an essential role.

Examining women's participation in the South Sea Bubble and the representations of investors and. Find many great new & used options and get the best and gender in early eighteenth-century England book for Authorship, Commerce, and Gender in Early Eighteenth-Century England: A Culture of Paper Credit by Catherine Ingrassia (, Paperback) at the best online prices at eBay.

Free shipping for many products. Get this from a library. Authorship, commerce, and gender in early eighteenth-century England: a culture of paper credit. [Catherine Ingrassia] -- Examining women's participation in the South Sea Bubble and the representations of investors and stockjobbers as feminised, this work discusses cultural resistance to speculative finance, and.

Get this from a library. Authorship, commerce, and gender in early eighteenth-century England: a culture of paper credit. [Catherine Ingrassia] -- Speculative investment and the popular novel can be seen as analogous in the early eighteenth century in offering new forms of "paper credit"; and in commerce, women - who invested enthusiastically in.

Includes bibliographical references (p. ) and index. Authorship, commerce, and gender in early eighteenth-century England: a culture of paper creditPages:   Authorship, Commerce, and Gender in Early Eighteenth -Century England: A Culture ofPaper Credit. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, xi + pp.

US$ ISBN Under an older critical dispensation, scholars identified the country house as the moral centre of and microcosm for eighteenth-century British culture. Scholar Commons Citation.

Runge, Laura, "Authorship, Commerce, and Gender in Early Eighteenth-Century England by Catherine Ingrassia" (). English Faculty : Laura L. Runge. 'Keen’s book is the product of a deep reading of the archive of the past, with impressive results.' David Simpson Source: European Romantic Review ‘ an important and substantial book that uncovers new depths and novel materials that will continue to reshape prevailing accounts of literature, knowledge, authorship, and reading in the fields of eighteenth-century and Romantic studies.’Cited by: 5.

Authorship, commerce, and gender in early eighteenth‐century England: a culture of paper credit. By Catherine Ingrassia. ‘A neutral being between the sexes’: Samuel Johnson's sexual politics. By Kathleen Nulton Kemmerer.

The Work(s) of Samuel Richardson. By Stephanie Fysh. Richardson's published commentary on Clarissa – Vol. About this book.

A Companion to the Eighteenth-century Novel furnishes readers with a sophisticated vision of the eighteenth-century novel in its political, She is the author of Authorship, Commerce, and Gender in Early Eighteenth-Century England () and the editor of Eliza Haywood's Anti-Pamela ().

This groundbreaking study examines the vexed and unstable relations between the eighteenth-century novel and the material world. Rather than exploring dress's transformative potential, it charts the novel's vibrant engagement with ordinary clothes in its bid to establish new ways of articulating identity and market itself as a durable genre.

Catherine Ingrassia, Authorship, Commerce, and Gender in Early Eighteenth-Century England: A Culture of Paper Credit and Laura Mandell, Misogynous Economies: The Business of Literature in Eighteenth-Century Britain, in Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature 18 (): Other.

Prefaces to. A new collection of essays which challenges many existing assumptions, particularly the conventional models of separate spheres and economic change. All the essays are specifically written for a student market, making detailed research accessible to a wide readership and the opening chapter provides a comprehensive overview of the subject describing the development of gender history as a whole.

Authorship, Commerce, and Gender in Early Eighteenth-Century England: A Culture of Paper Credit. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, Editor, Cambridge Companion to Women’s Writing in Britain, – Cambridge UP, Editor, Anti-Pamela, by Eliza Haywood, and Shamela, by Henry Fielding, with a critical introduction and appendices.

Italy's Eighteenth Century: Gender and Culture in the Age of the Grand Tour Article in The English Historical Review CXXV() January with 12 Reads How we measure 'reads'Author: Christopher Storrs. Authorship, Commerce, and Gender in Early Eighteenth-Century England does suffer from some weaknesses.

As it struggles with the complexity of eco-nomic and gender discourse, the book sometimes fails to explicate important words, such as "'frenzy,' a slightly gendered term" (p.

19). Neglecting to. Buy Gender in Eighteenth-Century England: Roles, Representations and Responsibilities 1 by Barker, Hannah, Chalus, Elaine (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.4/5(1). A former president of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, she is best known as the author of Daniel Defoe: His Life ().

Catherine Ingrassia is Professor of English at Virginia Commonwealth University. She is the author of Authorship, Commerce, and Gender in Early Eighteenth-Century England (). Authorship, Commerce, and Gender in Early Eighteenth-Century England: A Culture of Paper Credit By Catherine Ingrassia () | Miller Library PRE36 I54 The Feminization Debate in Eighteenth-Century England: Literature, Commerce, and LuxuryAuthor: Karen Gillum.(Cambridge, ); Catherine Ingrassia, Authorship, Commerce and Gender in Early Eighteenth-Century England: A Culture of Paper Credit (Cambridge, ); Kathryn Temple, Scandal Nation: Law and Authorship in Britain, 1 (Ithaca, ).

Annie Prassoloff, "Le.A former president of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, she is best known as the author of "Daniel Defoe: His Life" ().

Catherine Ingrassia is Professor of English at Virginia Commonwealth University. She is the author of "Authorship, Commerce, and Gender in Early Eighteenth-Century England" ().